Kitchen Window Ideas by Popular Architectural Styles

Homeowners and designers alike prize bright, airy kitchens. This ideal is true no matter what style of home you have. While designers might turn to different tricks, such as a light palette or abundance of glass, the best method for creating the bright, airy kitchen is with windows. Below are ideas for windows according to popular architectural styles for your remodel or new build.

Traditional

The traditional style can encompass several unique styles that are both contemporary and historical. Ranch homes are an example of traditional architecture. Architects favor some symmetry and natural materials. The style does feature some restrained ornamentation.

As the name suggests, traditional kitchens call for traditional windows, such as double-hung and single-hung. They can be with or without window grids. If you opt out of multi-paned windows, consider adding restrained ornamentation in the header and apron. You should have an even number of symmetrically placed windows.

Modern

One of the most popular current home styles is modern. Despite its name, the modern style is semi-historical in that it takes it roots in the modern movement of the early 20th century. Architects favor manufactured materials and a sense of drama that often comes out in boxy and geometric forms.

Floor-to-ceiling windows are very popular in modern architecture. You might see custom window walls. However, you can get a similar look with standard windows topped with transom glass. The obvious geometry is already inherent in the windows, but consider adding an elongated picture window to add another shape. The frames should be minimalistic and can be metal.

Pueblo Revival

The Pueblo Revival style takes its roots in the oldest form of architecture native to North America. Because of its beginnings, the style tends to favor blockish, geometric forms. You see little ornamentation.

For a Pueblo Revival home, square windows with no grids are best. The goal is for the windows to look simple. If you want more light, you could opt for rectangular windows with unadorned glass. For the trim around the window, you could get away with headers and aprons that feature traditional carving. Wood is the ideal material for the frames and trim.

Victorian

The Victorian style is one of the most popular historical styles in North America. While it features several sub-styles, the general characteristics remain the same. Victorian homes feature elaborate details and ornamental trim. They’re usually asymmetrical.

The Victorian kitchen should feature an odd number of windows to adhere to that last point. Because of that love of ornamentation, the windows should feature elaborate frames and trim. You often see differently shaped windows in Victorian houses. So, don’t be afraid to add an arched or even oval window.

Cottage

The cottage style is a scaled-down version of the Victorian. It features a modest and cozy atmosphere, but cottages take their roots in English architecture. So, like Victorians, they offer some ornamentation.

The windows for a cottage kitchen should offer a similar balance. Windows with multiple panes work well. You can choose a standard single-hung or double-hung. However, consider an arched window or set of windows. The arch adds a low level of ornamentation while staying true to the modest roots of the cottage. The cottage kitchen would a good area for a window seat or bay.

Craftsman

Craftsman-style homes feature peak craftsmanship because the style was born of the Arts and Crafts movement. Architects usually emphasize symmetry and call for natural materials.

For a Craftsman-style kitchen, the woodworking should take center stage. Double-hung, multi-paned windows are common. The frames ought to be wooden, though a well-formed composite could work. The frame should feature some carving to pay homage to craftsmanship. You could also incorporate a header and apron with ornamented woodworking.

Adhere to your home’s architectural style as you plan out the windows for your kitchen. Visit Pella Windows & Doors of Wisconsin for your remodel or new build.

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